THE HISTORY OF NADE

by Frank Giordano, Charter member of NADE, New Jersey

In 1963, a group of DDS directors meeting in Philadelphia founded the National Association of Disability Examiners (the generic name by which the organization is still known today) as a division of the National Rehabilitation Association (NRA). In the early days, the major direction for the organization came from the DDS Directors, most of whom were part of State Vocational Rehabilitation agencies. The National Rehabilitation Association adequately represented the NADE interests of the early days and organized annual conferences at which NADE was given a small segment of time for conducting organizational business.

As the years went on, the membership of NADE became mostly examiner and other line staff and the direction of the organization became mostly examiner oriented. In fact, the majority of the DDS directors encouraged this change. However, the changing interests of the NADE membership and growing divergent membership base found NADE more and more at odds with its parent organization. The membership eventually concluded that NRA could no longer effectively serve the organization and in Salt Lake City in 1978 the Delegate Assembly adopted a resolution amending the NADE Constitution and By-Laws to delete all references to NRA, thereby rendering the organization in non-compliance with the NRA Constitution and By-Laws and effectively establishing NADE as an independent organization. Despite predictions of NADE’s demise, the organization survived bitter opposition, maintained a sizeable membership base, and organized its first separate annual conference in Indianapolis, Indiana in 1979, devoting a full program of medical and other sessions, as well as conducting its organizational business. Not only did NADE survive, but it grew beyond all expectations not only in numbers but more importantly in status and influence.

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Soon NADE became recognized as the effective voice of professionals in the field of disability adjudication, encompassing examiners, administrators, physicians, support staff and others involved in the disability program. Legislative activity took on increasing importance to the point where it is today, sought by legislative committee to present testimony on a wide variety of program issues. SSA officials and legislative representatives meet regularly with the NADE Board and there is ongoing dialogue between these officials and representatives and NADE leaders.

The road to growth and increasing stature was not easy. NADE had to go through organizational problems which created some deep divisions, but overcame them and developed a sound financial structure and administrative accountability. NADE was able to maintain stability and come together to pursue its interests. The annual conference regularly featured interchange between NADE leadership and the DDS Directors working through the National Council of Disability Determination Directors (NCDDD). Joint legislative agenda were developed. Communication, both internal and external, was recognized as a priority. The NADE Advocate, established long before NADE’s withdrawal from NRA, was and still is the primary tool for passing on information to all its members. But NADE kept pace with technology, establishing a web site and making increase use of faxes and E-mail and other means of quick communication. Information to and from the membership was and is a top priority of NADE leaders.

NADE’s history is that of growth and continuity, of fighting through organizational problems to establish stability and credibility, of assuring the interest of the members were not pushed aside but ably represented by its leaders, of communicating both to the membership and to those who affect our lives and the lives of those we serve, and of awareness of the need to keep up with new and better ways of serving our constituency. It is an organization proud of its past and looking always to its future. Our past is our strength and the ground work for our tomorrow.

History of the NADE Emblem

NADElogo2by Carroll Moore, Past President, Tennessee

The emblem and masthead of the Advocate were designed and illustrated by Lucian J. Zadrozny, our first editor.  In the NADE Advocate Volume I, Number 1, February, 1966 Editor Zadrozny wrote:

The medical and related aspects of a person’s physical and/or mental condition, including age, are signified by the emblem’s caduceus, which is given central importance. Other key area such as occupations, vocational assessment, and education are respectively designated by the gear and burning lamp of knowledge. The scales serve as the balancing medium of judgment and justice imparted in considering all the factors that enter into sound objective determinations of disability and evaluation of potential.Lucian J. Zadrozny

NADE Presidents

2015-16, Sharon Summers, Tennessee
2014-15, Jeff Price, North Carolina
2013-14, Jennifer Nottingham, Ohio
2012-13, Richard Todd Deshong, Washington
2011-12, Tom Ward, Michigan
2010-11, Andrew Martinez, California
2009-10, Susan Smith, Ohio
2007-09, Georgina Huskey, California
2007-07, Barbara Styles, Alabama
2006-07, Charles Schimmels, Oklahoma
2005-06, Shari Bratt, Nebraska
2004-05, Martha Marshall, Michigan
2002-04, Theresa B. Klubertanz, Wisconsin
2002-02, Ken Forbes, Oregon
2001-02, Jeff Price, North Carolina
2000-01, Sue Heflin, Mississippi
1999-00, Terri Spurgeon, Louisiana
1998-99, Jeff Price, North Carolina
1997-98, Debi Gardiner, Louisiana
1996-97, Susan LaMorte, New Jersey
1995-96, Larry DeVantier, Illinois
1994-95, Linda Hill Langele, Mississippi
1993-94, Robert Burgess, Texas
1992-93, Dan Fulton, Louisiana
1991-92, Martha Marshall,Michigan
1990-91, Tom Christopher, Wisconsin
1989-90, Bruce Johnston, Georgia
1988-89, Karen Gunter, Florida
1986-88, David Tschetter, South Dakota
1986-86, Patricia Rusche, Washington, DC
1985-86, Michael Foster, Georgia
1984-85, Jeanette L. Fanning, Maryland
1983-84, Reves Gonzales, Texas
1982-83, Jeannette L. Fanning, Maryland
1981-82, Michael Lomax, Nebraska
1980-81, Carroll D. Moore, Tennessee
1979-80, Stephen Bonowski, Indiana
1978-79, Martin Blum, New York
1977-78, Robert B. Dean, Kentucky
1976-77, Richard Parsons, Colorado
1975-76, Lewis D. Buckingham, Washington, DC
1974-75, Carthon P. Phillips, Texas
1973-74, Drexel Revell, Florida
1972-73, Earl B. Thomas, Vermont
1971-72, Herbert L. Brown, Tennessee
1970-71, Fred R. Tammen, Missouri
1969-70, J. B. McElwee, Louisiana
1968-69, James L. Gilbert, Alabama
1967-68, Joy W. Hill, Illinois
1966-67, Don R. Reed, Florida
1965-66, Frederick W. Novis, Connecticut
1964-65, Arthur Cox, North Dakota
1963-64, Charles O. Blalock, Maryland

2016-17, Tonya Scott, Georgia
2015-16, Sharon Summers, Tennessee
2014-15, Jeff Price, North Carolina
2013-14, Jennifer Nottingham, Ohio
2012-13, Richard Todd Deshong, Washington
2011-12, Tom Ward, Michigan
2010-11, Andrew Martinez, California
2009-10, Susan Smith, Ohio
2007-09, Georgina Huskey, California
2007-07, Barbara Styles, Alabama
2006-07, Charles Schimmels, Oklahoma
2005-06, Shari Bratt, Nebraska
2004-05, Martha Marshall, Michigan
2002-04, Theresa B. Klubertanz, Wisconsin
2002-02, Ken Forbes, Oregon
2001-02, Jeff Price, North Carolina
2000-01, Sue Heflin, Mississippi
1999-00, Terri Spurgeon, Louisiana

1998-99, Jeff Price, North Carolina
1997-98, Debi Gardiner, Louisiana
1996-97, Susan LaMorte, New Jersey
1995-96, Larry DeVantier, Illinois
1994-95, Linda Hill Langele, Mississippi
1993-94, Robert Burgess, Texas
1992-93, Dan Fulton, Louisiana
1991-92, Martha Marshall,Michigan
1990-91, Tom Christopher, Wisconsin
1989-90, Bruce Johnston, Georgia
1988-89, Karen Gunter, Florida
1986-88, David Tschetter, South Dakota
1986-86, Patricia Rusche, Washington, DC
1985-86, Michael Foster, Georgia
1984-85, Jeanette L. Fanning, Maryland
1983-84, Reves Gonzales, Texas
1982-83, Jeannette L. Fanning, Maryland
1981-82, Michael Lomax, Nebraska

1980-81, Carroll D. Moore, Tennessee
1979-80, Stephen Bonowski, Indiana
1978-79, Martin Blum, New York
1977-78, Robert B. Dean, Kentucky
1976-77, Richard Parsons, Colorado
1975-76, Lewis D. Buckingham, Washington, DC
1974-75, Carthon P. Phillips, Texas
1973-74, Drexel Revell, Florida
1972-73, Earl B. Thomas, Vermont
1971-72, Herbert L. Brown, Tennessee
1970-71, Fred R. Tammen, Missouri
1969-70, J. B. McElwee, Louisiana
1968-69, James L. Gilbert, Alabama
1967-68, Joy W. Hill, Illinois
1966-67, Don R. Reed, Florida
1965-66, Frederick W. Novis, Connecticut
1964-65, Arthur Cox, North Dakota
1963-64, Charles O. Blalock, Maryland